Thursday, July 31, 2008

Tremblez Mortels...

Who needs analysis, when you have Hezb'o'statements. They always tell you what they really want. So tremble mortals! For those who did not get last month's memo, they inform us (again) that it's their way, or the highway... That's if the Israelis do not bomb it first, or the Syrians did not block it.



Methinks the invertebrates who claim March 14 will backtrack (again)... But as our pointless national "game" continues, mayhe each team can try choreographing their own "Haka". But even the best done Haka is only a show; the real "action" is what counts




But
our national "resistance" is nor merely playing a game. And unlike the All Blacks, its "victories" are not quite as real, and much more costly...


...

8 comments:

shunkleash said...

J,

Funny isn't? These lebanese pols are so short sighted and bloody minded. Imnagine they now clamour for a policy statement that attempts to reign in hizbteezee's faux resistance moniker. Yet they seem to forget the old adage...if you play with fire you get burned. Maybe someone should tell the M14 jokers that they can NOT be everyones friend and that to be a man WITH testicles means to LOVE your coutnry at ALL COST instead of your bank account. STOP laying wreaths and sanctimonious bullshit brimming accolades at the feet of turbanned neo nazi hooligans who are attempting to take over your country are total traitors and will kill you for a phone line. HEIL HIZBTEEZEE!!

ghassan karam said...

As bad as the Lebanese pols are collectively, the Christians among them take the cake for cluelessness.

Why are the Christians constantly asking for more power, to their tribe, when the Christian voters will account for less than 20% of the electorate in less than a generation? What is the logic that makes them feel that a Christian vote is equivalent to at least two moslem ones? The latest figures released by the Lebanese government show that there are 58,260 Christians between the ages of 18 to 21 while there are , in the same age group, 174,693 Moslems. What is the rationale that makes 25 % of the population dissatisfied with occupying 50% of the Chamber of Deputy seals? Are they arrogant, are they ignorant , are they supermacists or are they simply a weird combination of all the above?
Lebanon cannot be saved and will not be worth saving unless we can get rid of all the current bankrupt leaders and undertake a radical overhaul of the current system. Secularism, social justice, responsible electorate and modernity are the tenets on which a new Lebanon must be based otherwise the current odorous edifice will continue to deteriorate and accelerate its movement into oblivion.

Anonymous said...

Ghassan, why don't you go up there and be the only one to fulfill such a utopian plan.

Jeha said...

No need to be rude; GK makes a good point. However, I fear that le problème est mal posé...

The issue is not whether "the Christians" should cede to "majority rule"; as we see in Iran, many minorities have fared badly through "majority rule" under "the Shiites". Our own history, most recently when the Byzantines and Ottomans ruled us, shows what happens when we fall under the rule of "closed majorities", such as defined by ethnicities or religion.

In the absolute, we need a way to define secular majorities. And we need a way to fight superstitions, and thus guard against the rise religious or ethnic "closed majorities". At least. At best, we need to "preempt ideologically" and thus deflate those megalomaniacs who claim some "inspiration" of any sort, be it divine or otherwise. Such a system does not have to be a "lebanese-only" idea, but it has to be exportable to the region, not only to confront the excesses that we see in today's PSNS, the Baath, or the settler movement in Israel, but to offer an effective counterpoint to rising fundamentalists such as the growing number of Salafis or Khomeiny's heirs.

However, in the immediate, we need a system of checks and balances that dilutes any rigid majorities, and forces alignments based on pragmantic, economic needs.

Anonymous said...

If immigrants are allowed to vote so it is a fair game one voice one vote...it is that simple.
As long as there is no separation between the 'church'and religion in the islamic world...don't expect minorities to feel secure: the copts/the Kurds...the only exception here are the alawites

ghassan karam said...

The guarantee of equality to all and the protection against discrimination is a system that does not recognize religious practice but that is based on merit. That is why there is no substitute for secularism .

What is unfortunate about the Lebanese confessional system is that the Christian leaders support it because they think that they are doing what is good for their followers' rights when in effect they are supporting a system in which they will become totally marginalized within less than fifty years.

Confessionalism is a bad policy for the country as a whole since it discriminates against those that are qualifies but are of the
"wrong " religious persuasion but it is doubly wrong for the Christians in the long run since it is bad for the country and for them as a group. Demography is destiny especially in a sectarian system.

Anonymous said...

Ghassan,
Your overemphasis on confessionalism versus secularism is very outdated and simplistic...You think that secularism is a magic pill for all ills...it is much more complicated than what you think...

By the way, the new electoral map in Lebanon shows that both the shiaa and sunnis are trying to accomodate the Christians in order to cease power...It also shows that the division between 8th and 14th march(if we exclude HA's army) is the emerging two-party system in Lebanon...

ghassan karam said...

Anon 23:09
I wonder whether you would care to enlighten us by explaining the real "current and nonsimplistic" dynamic that explains confessionalism vs secularism.
In the final analysis confessionalism is discrimination by another name. Secularism , on the other hand, respects each individual for his/her capability irrespective of the religious practice. There ought not be any room for the secular in the public square if that secular belief is used in order to give its practitioners special privileges.

The failure of confessionalism as a basis of a political system in Lebanon is evident to all. To insist on prolonging the life of a system whose only accomplishments have been civil strife, divisiveness, dysfunctional state over and above inefficient allocation of human resources is nothing short of irresponsible and exploitative behaviour. Those who choose to support such an arrangement do so at their own peril.